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Lighting up the future

New 3elamp's external driver T8 tubes Series:

more than double the heatsink surface.

We was thinking in how to improve our worldwide acclaimed LED T8 tubes retrofit. We said: heat is the main enemy of an LED. In order to combat the heat we can use active or passive cooling systems.

 

Active systems introduce a new item that can also have problems. So, we thought, how can we have a better performance on the passive cooling?. The answer was so simple! Just increase the heatsink surface!!!. And here you have how we did: the new external driver LED T8 tubes from 3elamp.

 

Suitable to retrofit in every place where a fluorescent tube can be used. The external driver allows easily it to be used also as an emergency light solution. Dimmable options available with any light colour. Do you need anything else?

Re-energizing Aging Cities: The Green Building Option.

One hundred years ago, only 20% of the world's population lived in cities -- but that number topped 50% by 2010. Every year, the United Nations reports, nearly 60 million people move to cities worldwide. Today, cities make up just 2% of the world's surface, but hold more than half of the human population. They consume three quarters of global energy, and are responsible for 80% of carbon emissions, according to a Schneider Electric White Paper, "The Smart City Cornerstone: Urban Efficiency."

 

And the urban population is growing, adding one million people every week, and expected to increase 1.5% annually, from 3.4 billion in 2009 to as much as 6.4 billion by 2050. At mid-century, it is projected that 70% of the world's population will be urban.

 

Growth is concentrated in the world's "mega-cities," with populations of 10 million or more people. Nearly all of these cities have significant infrastructure challenges, and a majority of older, inefficient buildings. Buildings are themselves energy hogs, consuming almost 40% of U.S. energy, and more than 70% of produced electricity, as well as generating approximately 40% of American global warming gas. And old buildings, designed for a time of inexpensive energy, are prodigious wasters. Thanks to the growing science and practice of retrofitting older structures, however, they don't have to stay that way.

 

The waste problem is compounded in the United States, which has historically benefited from abundant, inexpensive sources of oil, natural gas and other resources. In early 2013, the U.S. won the dubious distinction of being the world's number one energy waster, using only 43% of the total generated power entering the economy.

 

But studies show that relatively minor adjustments to monitoring buildings' energy use -- and adding efficiency measures -- could reduce energy use dramatically. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), for instance, found that building shell improvements could reduce the need for space heating and cooling in both residential and commercial buildings by up to 60% in existing construction, and by 70% to 90% in new structures.

 

And LED lighting technology has a key role to play in this new scenario.

 

Published in Knowledge@Wharton, May-2013 issue (read the full article).

 

UL and NRTL System No Longer Required in US for Lighting Manufacturers.

Beginning as early as June 2013 UL and the NRTL System will no longer be required for Certifying and Testing of Lighting Fixture Housings, Components, and Assemblies.

The National Association of Independent Lighting Manufacturers (NAILM) will adopt the American Lighting Testing Authority's (ALTA) Testing Standard (TS84) at their Annual Meeting and conference this year in April at Lightfair 2013.

NAILM announced that it will file a Federal Law Suit against OSHA and NRTL Agencies for Anti-Trust violations which has allowed <5 NRTL agencies to Monopolize the testing and certification market which in turn has resulted in excessive fees. NAILM will add any Government Agency to the suit that refuses to accept Manufacturers that use ALTA as their certifying Agency and TS84 as their testing standard.

UL spends several hundred thousand dollars a year Lobbying to protect their financial position which has resulted in a Monopolized Trade with significant barriers to entry.

In April of 2008, UL met with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission to promote their conversion from a Non-Profit to a For-Profit Status citing increased competition as the reason. Unfortunately for the Lighting Industry increased profit just allows for higher fees, which has been the reality of the change. The move was approved with no opposition by the CPSC. In that same year, 2008, UL nearly doubled their lobbying expenses to nearly $400,000.

Using its previous Non-Profit status and lobbying at the Federal level UL has influenced OSHA and the NRTL system to be for a select few. NRTL system requires high fees too excessive for small business and/or restrictions on applicants that might be able to afford the higher fees. For example, OSHA allows UL to let their listing manufacturers self-test, yet prevents any manufacturer from establishing their own NRTL. The Application fee alone represents several months overhead for a small testing lab.

NAILMs research has established that there are 100s of certified Electrical Testing Agencies (ie NETA) and 1000s of licensed and insured professional engineers, all capable of providing better safety for the industry while reducing costs by as much as 84%.

 

Published in linkedin January-2013

Everybody knows that one good way to prevent sunburn is to stay inside, where you're safe from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Right?

Well, that may not be true anymore if your house is lit with compact fluorescent light bulbs. Researchers from the State University of New York at Stony Brook showed in a paper that tiny defects in the bulbs can let through UV light that can damage skin cells and lead to cancer.

 

This is the abstract of the study: ”Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can provide the same amount of lumens as incandescent light bulbs, using one quarter of the energy. Recently, CFL exposure was found to exacerbate existing skin conditions; however, the effects of CFL exposure on healthy skin tissue have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we studied the effects of exposure to CFL illumination on healthy human skin tissue cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Cells exposed to CFLs exhibited a decrease in the proliferation rate, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, and a decrease in their ability to contract collagen. Measurements of UV emissions from these bulbs found significant levels of UVC and UVA (mercury [Hg] emission lines), which appeared to originate from cracks in the phosphor coatings, present in all bulbs studied. The response of the cells to the CFLs was consistent with damage from UV radiation, which was further enhanced when low dosages of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), normally used for UV absorption, were added prior to exposure. No effect on cells, with or without TiO2 NPs, was observed when they were exposed to incandescent light of the same intensity.”

 

Published on July 18, 2012 in sciencedaily.com

Although CFLs are considered safe to use, there are a lot of steps you must follow to further protect you and your family.

On February of 2011 the Canadian Ministery of Health updated its publication about The Safety of Compact Fluorescent Lamps. When you read all the directions to follow for clean-up If a CFL is broken, you'll realize about what kind of hazard are we introducing in our lives.

 

The publication also covers topics as the UV and the magnetic fields that are inherent to the compact fluorescent lamps and the fluorescent tubes.

 

Click on the image to access to the full contents of this publication.

Re-energizing Aging Cities: The Green Building Option.

One hundred years ago, only 20% of the world's population lived in cities -- but that number topped 50% by 2010. Every year, the United Nations reports, nearly 60 million people move to cities worldwide. Today, cities make up just 2% of the world's surface, but hold more than half of the human population. They consume three quarters of global energy, and are responsible for 80% of carbon emissions, according to a Schneider Electric White Paper, "The Smart City Cornerstone: Urban Efficiency."

 

And the urban population is growing, adding one million people every week, and expected to increase 1.5% annually, from 3.4 billion in 2009 to as much as 6.4 billion by 2050. At mid-century, it is projected that 70% of the world's population will be urban.

 

Growth is concentrated in the world's "mega-cities," with populations of 10 million or more people. Nearly all of these cities have significant infrastructure challenges, and a majority of older, inefficient buildings. Buildings are themselves energy hogs, consuming almost 40% of U.S. energy, and more than 70% of produced electricity, as well as generating approximately 40% of American global warming gas. And old buildings, designed for a time of inexpensive energy, are prodigious wasters. Thanks to the growing science and practice of retrofitting older structures, however, they don't have to stay that way.

 

The waste problem is compounded in the United States, which has historically benefited from abundant, inexpensive sources of oil, natural gas and other resources. In early 2013, the U.S. won the dubious distinction of being the world's number one energy waster, using only 43% of the total generated power entering the economy.

 

But studies show that relatively minor adjustments to monitoring buildings' energy use -- and adding efficiency measures -- could reduce energy use dramatically. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), for instance, found that building shell improvements could reduce the need for space heating and cooling in both residential and commercial buildings by up to 60% in existing construction, and by 70% to 90% in new structures.

 

And LED lighting technology has a key role to play in this new scenario.

 

Published in Knowledge@Wharton, May-2013 issue (read the full article).

 

UL and NRTL System No Longer Required in US for Lighting Manufacturers.

Beginning as early as June 2013 UL and the NRTL System will no longer be required for Certifying and Testing of Lighting Fixture Housings, Components, and Assemblies.

The National Association of Independent Lighting Manufacturers (NAILM) will adopt the American Lighting Testing Authority's (ALTA) Testing Standard (TS84) at their Annual Meeting and conference this year in April at Lightfair 2013.

NAILM announced that it will file a Federal Law Suit against OSHA and NRTL Agencies for Anti-Trust violations which has allowed <5 NRTL agencies to Monopolize the testing and certification market which in turn has resulted in excessive fees. NAILM will add any Government Agency to the suit that refuses to accept Manufacturers that use ALTA as their certifying Agency and TS84 as their testing standard.

UL spends several hundred thousand dollars a year Lobbying to protect their financial position which has resulted in a Monopolized Trade with significant barriers to entry.

In April of 2008, UL met with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission to promote their conversion from a Non-Profit to a For-Profit Status citing increased competition as the reason. Unfortunately for the Lighting Industry increased profit just allows for higher fees, which has been the reality of the change. The move was approved with no opposition by the CPSC. In that same year, 2008, UL nearly doubled their lobbying expenses to nearly $400,000.

Using its previous Non-Profit status and lobbying at the Federal level UL has influenced OSHA and the NRTL system to be for a select few. NRTL system requires high fees too excessive for small business and/or restrictions on applicants that might be able to afford the higher fees. For example, OSHA allows UL to let their listing manufacturers self-test, yet prevents any manufacturer from establishing their own NRTL. The Application fee alone represents several months overhead for a small testing lab.

NAILMs research has established that there are 100s of certified Electrical Testing Agencies (ie NETA) and 1000s of licensed and insured professional engineers, all capable of providing better safety for the industry while reducing costs by as much as 84%.

 

Published in linkedin January-2013

Everybody knows that one good way to prevent sunburn is to stay inside, where you're safe from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Right?

Well, that may not be true anymore if your house is lit with compact fluorescent light bulbs. Researchers from the State University of New York at Stony Brook showed in a paper that tiny defects in the bulbs can let through UV light that can damage skin cells and lead to cancer.

 

This is the abstract of the study: ”Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can provide the same amount of lumens as incandescent light bulbs, using one quarter of the energy. Recently, CFL exposure was found to exacerbate existing skin conditions; however, the effects of CFL exposure on healthy skin tissue have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we studied the effects of exposure to CFL illumination on healthy human skin tissue cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Cells exposed to CFLs exhibited a decrease in the proliferation rate, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, and a decrease in their ability to contract collagen. Measurements of UV emissions from these bulbs found significant levels of UVC and UVA (mercury [Hg] emission lines), which appeared to originate from cracks in the phosphor coatings, present in all bulbs studied. The response of the cells to the CFLs was consistent with damage from UV radiation, which was further enhanced when low dosages of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), normally used for UV absorption, were added prior to exposure. No effect on cells, with or without TiO2 NPs, was observed when they were exposed to incandescent light of the same intensity.”

 

Published on July 18, 2012 in sciencedaily.com

Although CFLs are considered safe to use, there are a lot of steps you must follow to further protect you and your family.

On February of 2011 the Canadian Ministery of Health updated its publication about The Safety of Compact Fluorescent Lamps. When you read all the directions to follow for clean-up If a CFL is broken, you'll realize about what kind of hazard are we introducing in our lives.

 

The publication also covers topics as the UV and the magnetic fields that are inherent to the compact fluorescent lamps and the fluorescent tubes.

 

Click on the image to access to the full contents of this publication.

Re-energizing Aging Cities: The Green Building Option.

One hundred years ago, only 20% of the world's population lived in cities -- but that number topped 50% by 2010. Every year, the United Nations reports, nearly 60 million people move to cities worldwide. Today, cities make up just 2% of the world's surface, but hold more than half of the human population. They consume three quarters of global energy, and are responsible for 80% of carbon emissions, according to a Schneider Electric White Paper, "The Smart City Cornerstone: Urban Efficiency."

 

And the urban population is growing, adding one million people every week, and expected to increase 1.5% annually, from 3.4 billion in 2009 to as much as 6.4 billion by 2050. At mid-century, it is projected that 70% of the world's population will be urban.

 

Growth is concentrated in the world's "mega-cities," with populations of 10 million or more people. Nearly all of these cities have significant infrastructure challenges, and a majority of older, inefficient buildings. Buildings are themselves energy hogs, consuming almost 40% of U.S. energy, and more than 70% of produced electricity, as well as generating approximately 40% of American global warming gas. And old buildings, designed for a time of inexpensive energy, are prodigious wasters. Thanks to the growing science and practice of retrofitting older structures, however, they don't have to stay that way.

 

The waste problem is compounded in the United States, which has historically benefited from abundant, inexpensive sources of oil, natural gas and other resources. In early 2013, the U.S. won the dubious distinction of being the world's number one energy waster, using only 43% of the total generated power entering the economy.

 

But studies show that relatively minor adjustments to monitoring buildings' energy use -- and adding efficiency measures -- could reduce energy use dramatically. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), for instance, found that building shell improvements could reduce the need for space heating and cooling in both residential and commercial buildings by up to 60% in existing construction, and by 70% to 90% in new structures.

 

And LED lighting technology has a key role to play in this new scenario.

 

Published in Knowledge@Wharton, May-2013 issue (read the full article).

 

UL and NRTL System No Longer Required in US for Lighting Manufacturers.

Beginning as early as June 2013 UL and the NRTL System will no longer be required for Certifying and Testing of Lighting Fixture Housings, Components, and Assemblies.

The National Association of Independent Lighting Manufacturers (NAILM) will adopt the American Lighting Testing Authority's (ALTA) Testing Standard (TS84) at their Annual Meeting and conference this year in April at Lightfair 2013.

NAILM announced that it will file a Federal Law Suit against OSHA and NRTL Agencies for Anti-Trust violations which has allowed <5 NRTL agencies to Monopolize the testing and certification market which in turn has resulted in excessive fees. NAILM will add any Government Agency to the suit that refuses to accept Manufacturers that use ALTA as their certifying Agency and TS84 as their testing standard.

UL spends several hundred thousand dollars a year Lobbying to protect their financial position which has resulted in a Monopolized Trade with significant barriers to entry.

In April of 2008, UL met with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission to promote their conversion from a Non-Profit to a For-Profit Status citing increased competition as the reason. Unfortunately for the Lighting Industry increased profit just allows for higher fees, which has been the reality of the change. The move was approved with no opposition by the CPSC. In that same year, 2008, UL nearly doubled their lobbying expenses to nearly $400,000.

Using its previous Non-Profit status and lobbying at the Federal level UL has influenced OSHA and the NRTL system to be for a select few. NRTL system requires high fees too excessive for small business and/or restrictions on applicants that might be able to afford the higher fees. For example, OSHA allows UL to let their listing manufacturers self-test, yet prevents any manufacturer from establishing their own NRTL. The Application fee alone represents several months overhead for a small testing lab.

NAILMs research has established that there are 100s of certified Electrical Testing Agencies (ie NETA) and 1000s of licensed and insured professional engineers, all capable of providing better safety for the industry while reducing costs by as much as 84%.

 

Published in linkedin January-2013

Everybody knows that one good way to prevent sunburn is to stay inside, where you're safe from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Right?

Well, that may not be true anymore if your house is lit with compact fluorescent light bulbs. Researchers from the State University of New York at Stony Brook showed in a paper that tiny defects in the bulbs can let through UV light that can damage skin cells and lead to cancer.

 

This is the abstract of the study: ”Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can provide the same amount of lumens as incandescent light bulbs, using one quarter of the energy. Recently, CFL exposure was found to exacerbate existing skin conditions; however, the effects of CFL exposure on healthy skin tissue have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we studied the effects of exposure to CFL illumination on healthy human skin tissue cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Cells exposed to CFLs exhibited a decrease in the proliferation rate, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, and a decrease in their ability to contract collagen. Measurements of UV emissions from these bulbs found significant levels of UVC and UVA (mercury [Hg] emission lines), which appeared to originate from cracks in the phosphor coatings, present in all bulbs studied. The response of the cells to the CFLs was consistent with damage from UV radiation, which was further enhanced when low dosages of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), normally used for UV absorption, were added prior to exposure. No effect on cells, with or without TiO2 NPs, was observed when they were exposed to incandescent light of the same intensity.”

 

Published on July 18, 2012 in sciencedaily.com

Although CFLs are considered safe to use, there are a lot of steps you must follow to further protect you and your family.

On February of 2011 the Canadian Ministery of Health updated its publication about The Safety of Compact Fluorescent Lamps. When you read all the directions to follow for clean-up If a CFL is broken, you'll realize about what kind of hazard are we introducing in our lives.

 

The publication also covers topics as the UV and the magnetic fields that are inherent to the compact fluorescent lamps and the fluorescent tubes.

 

Click on the image to access to the full contents of this publication.

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